Icon
LamaKitchen

Nasi Lemak with Sambal Ikan Bilis (Malaysian Coconut Cream Rice with Anchovies Chili Paste)

Picture 1 of 6

Finally we cooked Nasi Lemak, a popular and authentic dish of Malay heritage. Nasi Lemak means “coconut cream rice” which is cooked in coconut cream instead of using plain water to give it a nice coconut aroma. You can add in Pandan or screwepine leaves for additional fragrance. Nasi Lemak is traditionally wrapped up with banana leaves with other sides such as roasted peanuts, hard boiled eggs, anchovies (ikan bilis) and most importantly the Sambal (chili).

For a more deluxe version, you can always order other entrees to go with it, such as Curry Chicken, Mutton Curry, Sambal Cuttlefish, Kangkung Belacan, Sambal Egg (mostly spicy dishes) and etc. You can find the recipes in the site and prepare to accompany the Nasi Lemak.

Read the rest of this entry »



Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • email
  • Print

Thai Chili Fish

Picture 1 of 5


We have been going through a Thai Curry tour by Patrick, introducing Thai  Red Curry, Green Curry, Yellow Curry, Panang Curry and Massaman Curry. Yes all curry dishes especially for you. We  hope you enjoy the curry as much as we do. I decided to have a change from the curry, but Thai food couldn’t live without spicy food. Presenting the infamous and delicious Thai Chili Fish.

For this dish, I recommend using catfish, seabass or salmon. Preferably to clean the fish and leave the head on, or you can also use the fish fillets. This is actually a very simple dish to make because I have skipped the deep frying part by having the fishman to clean and deep fry it in the Asian market. Many Asian markets in LA offer the fish cleaning and deep frying service.  The fish was perfectly cooked and hassle free, because deep frying in our small stuffy apartment will make the whole apartment smell like fish.

Read the rest of this entry »



Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • email
  • Print

Sambal Telur (Sambal Egg)

Picture 1 of 6

Nasi Lemak or Coconut Milk Rice wrapped in banana leaf is an all time Malaysian favorite dish. The traditional Nasi Lemak basically comes with a handful of fried anchovies, roasted peanuts, cucumbers and Sambal Egg. The dish sounds really simple, but we could just gobble down and be satisfied with a plain Nasi Lemak and lots of Sambal. Yes, the key ingredient to one great Nasi Lemak is of course the Sambal.

Sambal or Grounded Red Chili is one of the important components in traditional Malay cooking. The basic ingredient is just the fresh red chilies, then you start adding a little bit here and there of garlic, shallot, ginger, tamarind or others for a more robust flavored  Sambal. Once you do a couple of try outs in making your own Sambal, you can always prepare a full list of scrumptious Sambal dishes, such as Sambal Okra, Sambal Sotong, Sambal Asparagus with Shrimp, Vegetable Curry and etc.

Read the rest of this entry »



Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • email
  • Print

Sambal Cuttlefish / Sotong

Picture 1 of 5

We went to the market and wanted to get some fresh fishes, somehow the fresh cuttlefish laying on the seafood ice counter looked so tempting that attracted us so much to get it. I picked up a whole nice and big cuttlefish. So it was for the dinner, Sambal Cuttlefish or so called  Sambal Sotong.

The Sambal Sotong is usually served with Nasi Lemak (Malay Style Coconut fragrant steamed rice) or Nasi Bungkus (Pre-packed Coconut Rice) you can find in any Malay stalls. As previously mentioned, Sambal is a chili based paste used widely in cooking for Malay cuisine. Sambal is prepared from scratch with dried chilies, fresh chilies, garlic, ginger, shallots and other ingredients, grounded into paste. One important cooking tip is to cook the chili paste with oil on low heat until the oil oozes from the paste, or separated from each others.  The chili will turn into deep red in color, add some seasoning to taste.

Read the rest of this entry »



Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • email
  • Print

Stir-fried Kangkung with Fermented Bean Curd

Picture 1 of 4

Kangkung is a popular vegetable in my home country and most of Southeast Asia countries. Kangkung or Kang Kong, is also called Water Spinach or Hollow Spinach, or known as Ong Choy in Chinese. It is an Asian leafy vegetable,  inexpensive and nutritious. We usually eat it at home or in the restaurants. There is always an old saying that eating too much of Kangkung will make your legs go weak. Funny, I think this is because the Kangkung has long hallow stems that are empty like straws, which similar to weak legs that have no strength.

Previously I cooked the infamous Malaysian Style Stir Fry Kangkung Belacan (馬來風光), which is a very well-known dish in Malaysia, please check it out. This time I’ve cooked the Kangkung with fermented bean curd (腐乳), so called the Stir-fried Kangkung with Fermented Bean Curd or  Fuyu Kangkung (腐乳炒空心菜). Cooking with fermented bean curd is a popular Chinese cooking style, you can actually substitute with other vegetables such as You-Choy, A-Choy etc. The bean curd has been stored and fermented so it has a slight nice wine fragrant and the natural soy bean saltiness, so no extra salt is needed for this dish.

Read the rest of this entry »



Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • email
  • Print

Welcome

Lama Kitchen is a food and cooking blog fills with savory food with great cooking recipes and ideas for those of you who love food and home cooked meals. Read more